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Here are some questions to get you guys going... - We don't have a name yet

hmsickJun. 3rd, 2005 01:45 pm Here are some questions to get you guys going...

1. Julia Glass is also a painter. How do the style, structure, and description of Three Junes reflect her artistic sensibility? How do the various segments, stories, and flashbacks interspersed within the chronological text work together?

2. Marjorie, while traveling in Greece, says she cannot stop "collecting worlds . . . different views, each representing a new window" (p. 31). How is the role of the traveler and observer like the role of the author?

3. Place figures crucially in the novel, whether it is a Greek island, a Scottish town, the West Village of New York City, or a Long Island town. What is the importance of each place and its role in the context of the entire novel? What are the symbolic differences between the countryside and the city? Where does Fenno belong?

4. The episodes in the first part, Paul's vacation in Greece juxtaposed against the tale of his life in Scotland, come together to form a picture of his marriage with Maureen. Why does the author tell his tale in this fashion? Why is this part titled "Collies"?

5. Why does Paul, the steady shepherd of his family and newspaper, go to Greece first on vacation and then to live? Do you think he really wanted to "drop [his memories] like stones, one by one, in the sea" (p. 49)?

6. In the beginning, Fern reminds Paul of Maureen. Are the two alike or not? What are their similarities and differences? What does each want from life? How have Fern's relationships affected her character and choices? Why hasn't she told Stavros about her pregnancy? What is she afraid of?

7. Why doesn't Fenno visit his father in Greece? What else has Fenno postponed doing or compromised for the sake of work or being "upright"? What is Fenno consumed by? Where does the "coolness" between Fenno and his brother David stem from? Is it rivalry? Do you think this changes by the end? Which brother seems more admirable, and why?

8. What does the author accomplish by dividing the book into three parts with only the second as a first-person narrative? Why does she let Fenno tell his own story? What effect does this have on the reader? In addition, why does Fenno occasionally address the reader--for instance, when he says, "feeling left out, you will have noticed, is second nature to me" (p. 125)? Does this make us sympathetic to Fenno?

THIS IS HALF OF THE QUESTIONS TO BE ANSWERED. I WILL TRY TO REMEMBER TO POST ANOTHER BUNCH OF QUESTIONS ABOUT THE MIDDLE OF THE MONTH... YEAH RIGHT! Christi, take the book to Japan... never mind, you will probably finish it before you even leave!

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